What Do Brand Touchpoints Mean in Real Estate Agent Marketing?

Recently, after talking to a group of professionals in the construction business, the local distributor of Tyvek handed my colleague his card. Among its many purposes, Tyvek is used to wrap buildings at construction sites. The card was itself made from Tyvek, which makes for a fun, tactile, brand-reinforcing experience. I don’t doubt that many conversations have started with, “wow – what’s that card made of?”

A business card is a specific example of a brand touchpoint, a place where your brand as a real estate agent and your target home buyers meet.

Experienced marketers often say “Everything Communicates.” That’s a broad concept, but brand touchpoints bring it down to reality. Everything, from your business card to your actual product or service, says something about your brand as a real estate agent – and it’s your job to know what it’s saying.

Effective marketers know that they have to be intentional about everything that they do. In other words, you have to decide what you want to known for before you brand yourself. A message is crafted about why you are the best choice for the home buyers you want to work with. The voice, personality, and look-and-feel have to be right. After that, you can express that message using all of the channels of communication available.

Those channels are your brand touchpoints. They can include advertising, marketing collateral materials, web site and stationery. Those are the obvious ones. The touchpoints you don’t think of, though, are the ones that are likely cause you problems. These are things like voicemail messages, phone manner (of everyone who answers the phone on your behalf) and the appearance of coworkers, car, or office.

To expand on this, you want to ensure that each of these touchpoints is actually building up the “know, like, and trust” factor with your ideal clients. If you want to be known for being extremely businesslike, then your voicemail should be very to-the-point and your dress more sophisticated. If you wish your brand to be more folksy, then your voicemail can include a more friendly or inspirational message, and your dress may be more casual.

The most important thing is consistency. You want each brand touchpoint to be reinforcing the same message. Don’t let hidden brand touchpoints ruin your real estate agent marketing. Remember that everything communicates. That abrupt voicemail message or dirty car could undo a lot of hard work.

How Can a Good Real Estate Agent Help?

Consider the option of going ahead with a real estate agent because he helps the buyer or the seller of the property in more ways than one. Key responsibilities of a good agent make the entire process smooth, transparent, and easy for clients. However, this proposition is fraught with risk because finding a good agent is often a momentous task. This should not discourage home buyers and property sellers from hiring a good real estate agent as he alone can make things hassle-free for you. Therefore, your focus should be to look for an agent instead of searching for properties listed on various sites. Once you have roped in a verified and accredited agent to work on your behalf, the process of buying or renting or selling a home becomes much easier for you.

Local market knowledge

Equipped with local real estate market knowledge, he provides information of relevant properties available in the area. He studies the options that suit your budget and forwards the shortlisted options to you. This saves your valuable time and money. If you are interested, he shows you the properties. He is familiar with the area you would like to live in and offers accurate information about local infrastructure, school systems, water and sewer charges, public transportation and other concerns that impact your decision to rent or buy a home.

Negotiation

He takes care of the tedious process of negotiating the best deal for you. With skill and expertise, he knows the trends prevailing within the local property market and the competitive prices for various properties. You can bank on him to ensure the best deal and save your hard-money. His commission is also negotiable in most of the cases, depending on the level of involvement and effort put in.

Representation

He acts as your representative throughout the entire buying or selling process and therefore you need a reliable person you can fully trust in matters of right price and the suitable property features you need. He follows your instructions, works tirelessly to minimise your daily involvement in the matter of sale or purchase and seeks your presence only when it is unavoidable – to screen the best options for closing the deal.

Legal assistance

His knowledge about local laws related to the buying and selling of property helps you avoid legal issues. It ensures a smooth deal without any potential conflicts. A legally binding contract is drawn up and he helps you with all the paperwork, referring you to the appropriate professionals for dealing with all the legal matters.

Network

As his up to date with current trends, he nurtures contacts and the professional network to flourish his business. This enables him to be aware of a wide range of available property in the area and suggest options to clients with the help of fellow professionals. Not having an intermediary will deprive you of this big advantage. There is a limit to searching properties online or seeking references through your contacts, but if you have an agent, then there is no limit to the options he can suggest with ease. Most of his suggestions come pretty close to what you look for.

Exposure

Having him on board ensures maximum exposure for your property. Years of experience built an exhaustive database of potential customers and he refers your listing or requirement to generate leads. Gives sound advice on the market value component to price it realistically so that it is sold faster. He provides a visual presentation of your property and suggestions to enhance its marketability and coordinates marketing and advertising of your property on various platforms. Besides, the previews and arranges a walk through each potential home, to show properties that match your requirements and answers all your queries at various stages of the engagement to keep you updated of the progress achieved and ensure your satisfaction.

Real Estate Agent Cover Letter

The key to writing an effective Real estate Agent Cover Letter is to write it from the perspective of a customer. Most importantly though is that every letter should have a clear, specific purpose. So, as you sit down and prepare to write a letter make sure you are clear about what it is you want to accomplish.

Do you want a listing, or are you interested in showing the recipient a property? Whatever it is be specific about what your most desired response is and once it’s clear to you it’ll be easier to effectively communicate it to your prospects. So, think like a customer. What will make them interested in your product or service?

Here’s another bit of advice for both beginning and senior agents; don’t make the letter about you or your company. Your readers could care less about that. They’re more interested in what’s in it for them. So, your focus should be on the customer, their problems and how you can solve them.

Next up are headlines, arguably the most important part of your marketing letter. Generally, headlines should be longer than three to four words, but less than seventeen. Take a look at newspaper headlines and other sales headlines for inspiration. Then practice as often as you can.

Sometimes I use a nifty piece of software called Headline Creator. It prompts me to enter specific information and serves up a hundred or so possibilities. And while all of the possibilities aren’t useable, there are plenty of good ones to choose from.

Here are a few more points about a good Real Estate Agent Cover Letters.

  • Don’t exaggerate or lie about what you can do. If you do you run the risk of prospects getting wind of it and abandoning you for another agent.
  • Avoid long sentences. Be brief and to the point.
  • Use subheadings to make your letters easier to read. The subheadings should give enough information for someone skimming down the page to understand your offer.

Once you feel your letter is complete put it aside for a while and then proof read it again. I actually walk away for a full day and reread it the next day. It’s easier to spot mistakes when I do it that way.

Also, ask someone else to read it for you. Specifically, ask them to skim through it to see if they get the main points of the message. The feedback you receive can be the difference between a letter that you might like and one that a customer may love.

Letters to Potential Clients From a Real Estate Agent – Tips for Writing Marketing Letters

Introducing yourself in person is pretty easy. You make eye contact, smile, and shake hands. You tell the other person your name, and he tells you his name. Pretty easy, right? But what if you need to introduce yourself and you can’t see the other person? One way you can tackle this problem is by writing a marketing letter.

Whether you are new to real estate or just new to the area, you’ll want to send out some letters and let everyone know you are in the area and ready to sell. You can also use marketing letters to entice people who had listings expire to relist with you.

You can trick people into opening your letter and not just tossing it straight into the recycling bin by using a key word. “Free”. As a late-night ad used to say, “Free is a very good price.” So let everyone know you have something free inside. It might be a fridge magnet, or a set of free energy-saving tips, or a pocket calendar.

Now that you have their attention, you need to give your reader an introduction to you. Tell her who you are, and why you are the home expert she should trust. Give some tips or useful information in your letter that will be of use to your reader. Perhaps this might be a fall-cleanup checklist or winter weatherization tips. If you are targeting an up and coming area, you might want to give a list of local merchants for people to get started frequenting.

If you get completely stuck and have the worst case of writer’s block, you can download free templates from the internet. They can be introduction letters, prospecting letters, expired listings letters, or new agent letters, just to name a few. These are useful to help you get started and trigger a thought trail. They’re also good if writing is not your strong suit, but you are great at the verbal deal. (Some of these sites offer templates to help you with your listings, too.)

Keep the letter simple. Overcomplicated or technical newsletters will just confuse your readers and make them toss it. That also means your name is not the one they will tuck in their dream home folder for when the time comes to buy.

It might seem obvious, but be sure you use a good spell checking program and a grammar checker if you are not strong in either. It only damages your reputation if you have errors that can be easily fixed by these programs.

Last, close with a call to action. It could be asking the reader to visit your website for more information or to subscribe to your newsletter or podcast. It might be a link to your Facebook page on which you have a coupon to a local merchant. Or you may have some DIY tips on your YouTube channel. Whatever it is, you want it to be a good reason to follow up, something that will be worth your reader’s time. And time these days is more valuable than ever.

Commercial Real Estate Agent Prospecting Facts and Strategies

When you work as a commercial real estate agent or broker, it is essential that you develop and implement a prospecting program to generate new business leads. It is a personal process and it is not something that you can or should delegate.

I am amused sometimes when I hear that an agent has paid considerable money to a marketing company to ‘cold call’ their entire sales territory or market segment looking for leads and prospects to serve. Delegating the prospecting process to a marketing company or another ‘unskilled person’ is a waste of time and money. Commercial real estate is an industry built around personal relationships and trust; a marketing company or employed canvasser cannot offer that level of communication or service.

So why would a real estate agent employ such a ‘marketing firm’ to make prospecting calls? The answer in most cases is glaringly obvious; the agent doesn’t have the skill or the discipline for the prospecting process to be successful.

If you want to win the new business, then you will need to do it yourself. Yes, it takes time to get results and you will need to develop some new skills, but discipline will help you get to the results that you are seeking.

One thing should be said here; commercial real estate brokerage is tremendously rewarding for the sales people that can work hard and to a system or plan. Looking for leads and opportunities is part of the process or game. It’s a personal thing and it can’t be delegated.

Here are some way’s to find new business, better property listings, and good clients:

  • Redundant Properties – Some properties will move to a level of redundancy due to age, deterioration, change of zoning, or lack of tenants. When this happens it is time to move to the next phase of the property ‘lifecycle’. A good real estate agent can see the signs early and work closely with a property owner as they start to deal with the issue of investment change.
  • Vacant Land – As a city expands or suburbs change, vacant land will be rezoned for new development. Keep ahead of this opportunity by monitoring the planning and development applications at your local planning approvals office. Get copies of the public minutes of the planning committee meetings.
  • Old Listings – Some listings don’t sell or lease at the first attempt. What you can do here is withdraw the property from the market today and then revisit the property marketing effort a few months later in another and perhaps different marketing approach. Refreshing a listing is a valuable business process.
  • Open Listings – The best way to sell or lease a property is through an exclusive listing process. Open listings are very much a process of luck; most open listings stay on the market for a very long time and on average are far less successful when compared to the dedicated marketing efforts of an exclusive listing. Revisit old open listings to see if they can be optimised for a fresh marketing effort.
  • Larger Businesses – Local businesses are involved in property either as tenants or as owner occupiers. Business owners will need help with property from time to time. The best way to tap into that opportunity is through direct and ongoing contact. Cold call every business in your town or city and speak to them regularly about property needs and changes.
  • Surrounding Other Listings – When a competing agent puts a property on the market, you can use that listing as a reason to talk to all adjacent and nearby business and property owners. One property listing can be the catalyst to talk to others to see if they would like to compete or do something themselves.
  • Street Canvass – On a street by street basis, systematically move through your sales territory and research all property owners. Eventually you will create a good list of owners for your database. Ongoing contact will allow you to build valuable client relationships and the levels of trust that help grow commissions and listings.
  • Cold Calling – The telephone remains the most effective business tool that we have. Direct calls handled in a professional way will help you reach out to new people. Selectively researching the property owners and business people in your area will support the cold calling process.

A simple list like this will give you an abundance of property leads and opportunities. The secret to making things work for you is in doing it yourself.